Historical Profiles

 
 

Elisha BULL

29 July 1827 – 26 August 1905

 

Elisha Bull, a son of Ezra and Margaret (Hadwin) Bull, was born in Rutland County, Vermont. He died in Silt, Garfield County, Colorado. A government issue headstone, which reads “LIEUT. ELISHA BULL   CO. B.  75 ILL. INF.”, marks his grave in the Evergreen Cemetery at Leadville, Colorado.

 

Nancy A. Blakely and Elisha were married about 1847 and in 1850 were living in Collins, Erie County, New York with an infant daughter, Angellee. Elisha was a shoe maker.

 

Nancy died 26 December 1858 and was interred in the Lyndon Cemetery near Lyndon, Whiteside County, Illinois. Elisha and his second wife, Helen M. Chamberlain were married 24 November 1859 in Whiteside County, Illinois. The 1860 census lists Elisha, Helen, Angela and Ansel Bull living in the village of Lyndon. Both children were from Elisha's first marriage. The family was residing in Lyndon at the time Elisha enlisted in the Army. After his term of service in the 33rd Illinois, he re-enlisted in Co. B of the 75th Illinois Volunteer Infantry.

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At the end of the war, Elisha returned to Lyndon and his family. By 1870 the Bulls had moved to State Centre, Iowa, and it was from there that Elisha left to “go west” and give mining a try. Helen remained in State Centre. She was divorced from Elisha in October of 1882 and continue to live in State Centre until her death on 6 February 1903. Her obituary attests to her service as a volunteer nurse during the Civil War.

 

The 1880 census of Black Hawke, Gilpin County, Colorado lists Elisha Bull, age 52, a miner and living as a boarder in the home of Charles Hanson.

 

Elizabeth (Tabor) Sherman and Elisha Bull were married on 10 Oct 1887 in Leaville, Lake County, Colorado. This was a second marriage for “Lizzie”. The 1900 census enumerated them as living in Antlers, Colorado. The family included George, age 9, Margaret, age 6 and Augusta, age 4. After Elisha died, Elizabeth remained in the Garfield County area where she died of the flu on 9 December 1918. She is buried in Leadville's Evergreen Cemetery. Her first husband Luther I. Sherman,  Elisha Bull, the band member and their son George Bull are all interred there.

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C.S. ELDER

 

Dr. Elder was born in Waterloo, New York, May 7, 1835, and came to Illinois at an early age. When the Civil War broke out, he enlisted on September 1, 1861, joining the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry as a musician.

 

 He received an honorable discharge in October 1862 when he entered Rush Medical College in Chicago. He graduated from that institution in March, 1863, and soon after located in Bloomington, but later went to Chenoa where he practiced until 1875. 

 

Then he returned to Bloomington until 1879, when he took up his residence in Lexington, practicing in this city until 1884, after which he went back to Chenoa, where he passed the remaining years of his life.

 

Carl Wilhelm GRAEN

(Charles A. Green)

17 August 1840-4 April 1912

 

Carl Graen, a son of Georg and Charlotte (Schlosshauer) Graen, was born in Braekel, Westphalia, Germany. He died in La Harpe, Allen County, Kansas. A small family headstone marks his burial site in the Evergreen Cemetery at Ft. Scott, Kansas.

 

The first record found for Carl was in the 1860 Census of Toulon, Stark County, Illinois. He

was listed as Charles Green, a painter from Germany. Charles and brother George Green, also a

painter, were roomers at a tavern in the village of Toulon. Charles used the name of Green when he joined the Army and was enumerated on the 1870 Census as Charles Green, wholesale and retail druggist, Ft. Scott, Bourbon County, Kansas.  Charles had studied structural and architectural engineering before leaving Germany. After his time of service in the Union Army, he returned to Germany to visit relatives and spent eighteen months in Africa before returning to America.

 

Charles was married to Ida L. Lowe on 1 July 1872 in Ft. Scott, Kansas. The 1880 Census

listed Charles Graen, wife Ida L. and children – Percy, age 5 and Hazel, age 2 as residents of Ft. Scott. The family remained in Kansas except for a brief time in 1894 when Charles went to Stotesbury, Missouri. In 1899, Charles, Ida, and son Percy moved to LaHarpe, Allen County, Kansas. Ida L. Graen died on 5 March 1926. She is buried beside Charles in the Evergreen Cemetery at Ft. Scott, Kansas.

 

Carl Graen may have served as the leader of the 3rd KY Cavalry Regiment Band. This service would have begun sometime in 1862 and as a civilian rather than as enlisted personnel.

 

George Alexander Lowman

10 January 1839 – 19 March 1913

 

George A. Lowman was born in Monroe, Highland County, Ohio. He died in Arcadia, DeSoto County, Florida. He is interred at the Toulon Cemetery, Toulon, Illinois. His grave site is marked by a family headstone and a bronze star placed by the Grand Army of the Republic.

 

His parents were William and Esther Lyle (Keys) Lowman. George and his parents are listed in the 1850 census as residents of Knoxville, Knox County, Illinois. His father was a “taylor”. In 1860, the census enumerator showed the family living in Toulon, Stark County, Illinois. George was a clerk and his father the County Treasurer.

 

George and Mary E. Beatty were married on 24 June 1869 in Toulon, Illinois and in 1870, they were living in the village of Toulon. The census of 1880 showed George was farming and they were parents of a son Frank, who was 9 years old. They had moved to Fulton County. In 1900, the family, now living in Stark County, included children Frank (age 29), Alice (age 18), and Amelia {probably should be Aurelia} (age 16).

 

George's obituary is printed in the Stark County News, Toulon, Illinois. His service in the Army is noted with the following items: “After completing his education, he continued in his father's store until the outbreak of the Civil War, when on the 14th of August, 1861, he enlisted in the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry and served his country loyally as a musician in the regimental band.” The tribute also stated that he was a good neighbor, a good friend, public-spirited, and willing at all times to do his part for the general good. He was genial and lighthearted by nature, and his optimism remained with him to the last.

 

Mary E. Lowman died on 18 October 1930 at her home in Toulon. She was interred beside her husband in the Toulon Cemetery at Toulon, Illinois.

Research & Narrative by:   Liz and Dick Veselack, Updated Oct. 2002

 

* Mr. Lowman's obituary states that he was a “resident here (Toulon, IL) over 60 years”. It further notes that he “was a member of the Masonic fraternity for many years, and also of the Grand Army of the Republic, in both of which organizations he was an active worker as long as the state of his health permitted.”

 

Samuel Edgar LYON

1839(?) - 9 October 1888

 

We believe Samuel E. Lyon was born in Cass County, Illinois. He died in Lincoln, Logan County, Illinois and is buried in the Union Cemetery at Lincoln, Illinois. A government issue headstone which reads “E.S. LYON CO. K 33rd ILL. INF.” marks his grave site.

 

His father probably was Samuel C. Lyon who was listed in the 1840 census of Cass

County. We know that his mother's given name was Rebecca and that following the

death of her first husband, she was married to Samuel Tilly. Mr. Tilly, Rebecca, and

her children, including our subject Samuel, were enumerated for the 1850 census as

residents of Cass County, postal address, Chandlerville, Illinois.

 

The 1860 census listed Sam'l E. Lyon, age 24, living with his mother and brother in

Chandlerville, Illinois. After Samuel completed his 1st year of service with the 33rd

Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band, he continued with the 33rd in Co. K. He served on

“detached duty” as a wagon and carriage maker. He later went to Lawrence, Kansas

where he worked as a wagon maker. Samuel was married to Anna R. Bartleman on

9 October 1867 in Lawrence. The 1870 census of Lawrence lists Samuel, Anna, and

their first child, Lillian. Rebecca Tilly, age 63, is living with the Lyon Family.

 

Samuel and family moved back to Illinois and settled in Lincoln. By 1880, the family

included two more children, Elsie and Charles Edgar. Raymond, a second son, was

born in September 1888, just a few weeks before the death of Samuel. Raymond died

the next spring on 6 May 1889.

 

Anna's health was poor, and after Samuel's death, her financial situation was very strained. The family became dependent on friends for food and clothing.

 

The 1900 census of Cook County shows Lillian Butler, a widow, as the head of a household in Chicago. Her mother, Anna Lyon, and her brother, Charles Lyon, are members of her household. Anna Lyon died on 22 October 1909. Her place of death and burial site are unknown.

 

The Lincoln Times printed a brief notice at the time of Samuel's death as follows. “S.E. Lyons, who has for many years been head wood-worker at Herman and Co's. Carriage Shop, died Tuesday evening at 5 o'clock at his residence of pneumonia after a short illness of two weeks, aged 49 years. He leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss. Funeral services will be held to-day.”

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Submitted by Sara Simpson 2019

 

Cyrus Albert MINOR

21 August 1823 – 19 January 1901

 

Cyrus, the son of Cyrus Royce and Louisa Andrus (Norton) Minor, was born in Rochester, Monroe County, New York. His burial site is in the Walnut Hill Cemetery at Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois. Cyrus served as a 3rd class musician in the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band and later as a Corporal in Co. K of the 8th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. His government issue headstone reads: “CORP'L C.A. MINOR CO. K. 8 ILL. INF”.

 

Maria Sophia Buchannan was born on 4 June 1829 in Scotland. She became the wife of Cyrus Minor some time before 1850, exact date and place as yet unknown. Census records show their children as born in Illinois. However, this family has not been found in either the 1850 or the 1860 census of Illinois or surrounding states.

 

Cyrus Minor was a veteran of the Mexican War, having served from fall of 1847 until spring of 1848. 

When Cyrus enlisted with the 33rd Illinois Infantry on 15 Aug 1861 at Lyndon, Illinois by Captain Lippencott, he was described as a cabinet maker with auburn hair and blue eyes. He was mustered in at Camp Butler, IL and mustered out 16 Aug 1862 by Lt. Price by order of the War Department, Washington, D.C.

When Private Minor joined the 8th Illinois Infantry, he was 5'9” tall with light hair, blue eyes, and light complexion. He became a corporal and mustered out from that organization 25 Sep 1865 at New Orleans, LA by Captain Hitch. In 1880, Cyrus wrote the following: "In Feb'y 1865, while on march from Ft. Morgan to Mobile Bay (east side) the pine forest was on fire and smoke and cinders impaired my eyesight very seriously. Was treated by reg. surgeon, was not in hospital." There was also a pension claim on impaired sight.

 

The 1870 and 1880 census records list Cyrus and family as residents of Quincy, Adams County, Illinois. The 1870 census lists the Minor children as Albert, Julia M., Harriet, Jennie, and Mary E. Another source, a family tree posted online, records the children as Albert Alexander, Julia Ann, Harriet E., Joannie, Mary E.I., Daisy Gina, and Lizzie.

 

Mary Sophia, wife of Cyrus, died on 16 January 1882 in Belleville, Illinois. She was interred in Walnut Hill 

Cemetery, Belleville.

 

Cyrus, a pattern and cabinet maker by trade, worked at that profession in both Quincy and Belleville, Illinois. He died at the home of his only son, Albert A. Minor, in Springfield, Greene County, Missouri. The remains were taken to Belleville, Illinois for burial. An escort from the Springfield Masonic Lodge accompanied the body and participated in the funeral. The Odd Fellows and the Grand Army of the Republic also took part in the service.

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Edited and Submitted by Sara Simpson 2020

 

Charles Ambrose KITCHEN

Illinois Wesleyan University Student

20 October 1839 – 17 April 1907

 

Charles Kitchen was the son of John K. and Hannah (Ambrose) Kitchen. He was

born in Troy, Miami County, Ohio. He died in Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County,

California. His remains were buried in Santa Cruz Memorial Park at Santa Cruz,

California. Sometime during the year of 1928, his remains were removed to

Oakland, California for cremation. As of the year 2000, the location of his ashes

was unknown. 

 

In the 1860 census of Lexington, McLean County, Illinois, John and Hannah

Kitchen had three children living with them. Their sons, Charles and Joseph,

were attending Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, and daughter Emma

was at home. Charles and Joseph were soon to join the U.S. Army, each serving

in a different unit. Following his service in the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment

Band, Charles continued his studies at Illinois Wesleyan. 

Joseph L. Kitchen, the younger brother, was a “fife major” among the non-

commissioned staff of the 33rd Illinois Infantry. Joseph graduated from IWU

in 1865. Charles was a “junior” there in 1862-63 but may have transferred

elsewhere for dental training. 

 

Abby E. Gardner, the daughter of Oliver and Julia (Hardy) Gardner of Toulon, Stark County, Illinois, was married to C.A. Kitchen on 8 October 1886 in Toulon, Illinois. Charles was listed in the 1870 census for the town of Galva, Henry County, Illinois. He and wife Abby had two sons – Charles, age 2 and E.W., age 7 months. Charles' occupation was listed as – dentist. Another source told of a dental office in Toulon, Illinois which was open once a week. 

 

The 1880 census reported Charles and Abby living in Rockford, Winnebago County, Illinois. Charles, a dentist and Abby, at home were living in a boarding house. They had no children with them. And after checking several sources, no further record of either child has been found. 

 

Charles' obituary, April 1907, related that around 1901, Dr. Kitchen went to California and served as the superintendent of the infirmary of the dental department of the University of Southern California at Los Angeles. His wife died “three years ago” (1904), and he had remarried. Dr. Edna Osborne, a dentist who had studied under Dr. Kitchen at the university and who had cared for Mrs. Kitchen during her last illness, became his second wife in October 1906. 

 

It has been reported that he had not missed a meeting of the Dental Society for 28 years.

 

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Submitted by Sara Simpson 2019

 

James B. SANDERS

13 September 1840 – 17 August 1893

 

James was born in Williamstown, Massachusetts and died in Centralia, Marion County, Illinois. He is interred at Elmwood Cemetery, Centralia, Illinois. The grave site is marked by a large family headstone which James shares with his wife and her parents. His parents were George Anthony and Mary Sanders.

James may have been in Illinois in 1860, but at this time has not been found in the census record. Mary A. Tomkins became James' wife on 25 March 1869 in Salem, Illinois. The 1870 census of Centralia, Illinois enumerated James Sanders, age 30, a jeweler, his wife Mary, age 25, and Jessie, their 6-month-old daughter. The Sanders family was living with Mary's parents, Francis M. and Lucy Tomkins. Mr. Tomkins was a merchant.

The 1880 census record listed the Sanders and Tomkins families living together at 209 Maple Street in Centralia. The Sanders' daughter, Jessie was listed as “Jennis”, and two more daughters, Lucy Josephine and Mabel Augusta, had been added to the family. James, who had been in business with his father-in-law, later became a partner in a jewelry store in Centralia.

Mr. Tomkins, Mary's father, died in February 1893, and six months later, Mary's husband James passed away. Mary continued to make her home with her widowed mother. Also living in the home were two of Mary's daughters, Mabel, an artist, and Josephine (Sanders) Beaver and her son, Ralph S. Beaver.

Mary, also known as “Mollie”, was the daughter of Francis M. and Lucy A. (Roys) Tomkins. She died on 3 August 1920 and is buried in the Elmwood Cemetery at Centralia, Illinois.

James B. Sanders is included in a biographical sketch of his father-in-law, Francis Tomkins. The Sanders portion of the sketch closes with the following comment: “One of his most notable characteristics was his musical ability; not only was he very fond of music, but he displayed great skill in that area and possessed a strong and melodious voice.”

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Submitted by Sara Simpson 2019

 

 

One of the original members of 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band is said to have been among the band members who played for the funeral of President Abraham Lincoln.

 

Edward Everett Scott was born in Greensboro, Orleans County, Vermont and died in Winslow, Kitsap County, Washington. He is buried at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Seattle, Washington. The grave site is marked by a small family headstone. His parents were Samuel Garvin and Sarah (Haines) Scott.

 

The Scott family was listed in the 1850 census of Lamoille County, Vermont and included Samuel age 38, Sarah age 35, and sons Luther LeRoy and Edward E. along with daughter Sarah.

 

The census of 1860 for Whiteside County, Illinois has listed Edward E. Scott living with his parents and older brother Luther. They were living near the village of Lyndon. Edward and his father enlisted in the Army and became members of the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band. Edward also served, for a second term, near the end of the war. This service was with the Camp Butler Post Band in Springfield, Illinois. After Edward returned to the Lyndon area, he was married to Cordelia Ann Scoles. The wedding ceremony, performed by Samuel G. Scott, took place on 2 March 1864 in Whiteside County, Illinois.

 

The 1880 census of Whiteside County included Edward age 37, Cordelia age 34, and children Minnie age 13, Sarah age 10, William age 8, and Delia age 2. Cordelia Ann (Scoles) Scott was the daughter of William and Emily (Beckwith) Scoles. She died on 9 June 1922 in Winslow, Kitsap County, Washington and is interred beside her husband Edward at the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.

 

Edward Scott had been a farmer and later in life a carpenter and builder. In 1960, Edward’s youngest daughter wrote a short essay of remembrances of her childhood. This short statement tells of her father’s musical ability. “Father taught band, five or six at a time, after a day’s work. Sadie (his sister) played the organ, and Will (his brother) played the tuba. Father had played cornet at Abraham Lincoln’s funeral and had been in the Union Army in the Civil War.”

Edward Everett SCOTT

1843 - 1905

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Scott's Daughter Delia Wrote Remembrances

Edward Scott as an older man.

 

John WHITLEY

 

John Whitley was a member of the 33rd Drum Corp, not the band.  However, we are pleased to include him in our 33rd History. Whitley standing by the chair has a drum embroidered on his sleeves, a key on a chain, and a badge on his vest. He is shown with a slouch hat and original side drum. 

 

Augustus Guthrie WOODWARD

1 May 1833 – 19 April 1920

 

Augustus was born in Erie County, Pennsylvania and died in Alameda, Alameda County, California. He was cremated at the Oakland Crematorium in Oakland, California. The crematorium records state that Mr. Woodward's ashes were given to Mrs. Woodward. Augustus' wife, Maggie, died in 1918, therefore we believe that the Mrs. Woodward referred to in those records was probably the wife of one of Augustus' sons. Augustus was the son of Ezra W. and Cornelia (Prindle) Woodward.

 

The 1860 census of Lexington, Illinois lists Augustus Woodward, age 26, a blacksmith, living in the home of Malcom Magill, also a blacksmith. Another boarder at the Magill home was Sarah E. Luce, age 20, a school teacher.

 

Augustus joined the Army and served for one year as a member of the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band. 

Augustus and Sarah were married on 1 October 1862 in Lexington, Illinois. Their first daughter, Carrie Cornelia, was born in August 1863 at Lexington. A second daughter, Fannie, was born in 1866 and died in 1869. The 1870 census of Lexington, Illinois recorded Augustus Woodward, age 37, blacksmith and head of the household, his wife, Maggie, age 29, and a daughter, Carrie, age 7.

 

Sarah Elizabeth (Luce) Woodward, the daughter of Samuel Soverhill and Jane Ann (Lucas) Luce, died on 22 August 1875. She was buried beside her daughter Fannie in the Evergreen Cemetery at Bloomington, Illinois.

Margaret Celestia Boller became the second wife of Augustus Wooward on 29 June 1879 in Lexington, Illinois. The 1880 census listed Augustus, a blacksmith, his wife Margaret, and two daughters, Carrie and Gussie.

 

Carrie Woodward was married to William M. Davidson on 21 December 1881 in Lexington. Augustus and Maggie had a son, Frank born in 1880 and a daughter Grace L. born in 1882.

 

During the time Augustus lived in Lexington, he was the director of Woodward's Silver Cornet Band. In 1886, shortly after the Woodwards had moved to Tulare, California, their new home and blacksmith shop were destroyed by fire. The Lexington newspaper told of a benefit concert given by the Silver Cornet Band, the proceeds being sent to their former leader in Tulare.

 

The 1900 and 1910 census recordings list the Woodward family as residents of Tulare. Two more children, Louis Augustus and Dorothy Diana were born in Tulare.

 

Margaret died on 11 September 1918 at home in Oakland, California. She had been a school teacher. The remains were cremated. Her obituary was published in the Lexington paper and closed with this sentence. “Mr. Woodward was the leader of the band in the 33rd Ill. Reg't during the War of the Rebellion”.

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Submitted by Sara Simpson 2019

 

Samuel Garvin SCOTT

10 January 1812 - 28 March 1892

 

Samuel was born in Greensboro, Orleans County, Vermont and died in Mapleton, Monona County, Iowa. His grave site, in Heister Cemetery near Mapleton, Iowa, is marked by a small obelisk. Samuel was the son of Luther and Matilda (Works) Scott.
   
Samuel and Sarah Haines were married on 12 December 1837 in Greensboro, Vermont. Sometime after January 1848, the Scott family moved west and settled in Lyndon, Whiteside County, Illinois. The family is noted in the 1860 census of Lyndon, Illinois. Samuel and his son, Edward E. Scott, volunteered for service with the Army, and both became members of the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band. Samuel transferred from the band on 1 February 1862 and was appointed Drum Major for the regiment. He continued in that position until 3 April 1862 when he was discharged for medical disability.

After his return from the Army, the family left Illinois and spent a short period in Iowa before going to Missouri. The 1870 census listed Samuel and wife living together with their son Edward and family in Jefferson County, Missouri. Samuel's older son, Luther and family, were still in Whiteside County, Illinois. 

Sometime before 1880, Luther and family moved to Monona County, Iowa and settled in Centre Township. Samuel and Sarah had also moved from Missouri back to Iowa and were making their home with son Luther and family.

Sarah (Haines) Scott died on 7 November 1891 in Mapleton, Iowa. She was the daughter of Moses K. and Jemima (Leach) Haines. Sarah was interred at Heister Cemetery beside her husband Samuel.
   
The eulogy delivered at Samuel Scott's funeral relates that he was converted in early life to the Methodist Church. “He joined the ministry and labored as a Methodist preacher. This calling he followed the greater portion of his life, though at times he taught school and worked on a farm. He was a striking example of a devout Christian, and many is the one who can testify to the good and noble deeds done by him.”

               

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Submitted by Sara Simpson 2019

 

James B. SANDERS

13 September 1840 - 17 August 1893

 

James was born in Williamstown, Massachusetts and died in Centralia, Marion County, Illinois. He is interred at Elmwood Cemetery, Centralia, Illinois. The grave site is marked by a large family headstone which James shares with his wife and her parents. His parents were George Anthony and Mary Sanders.
     
James may have been in Illinois in 1860, but at this time has not been found in the census record. Mary A. Tomkins became James' wife on 25 March 1869 in Salem, Illinois. The 1870 census of Centralia, Illinois enumerated James Sanders, age 30, a jeweler, his wife Mary, age 25, and Jessie, their 6-month-old daughter. The Sanders family was living with Mary's parents, Francis M. and Lucy Tomkins. Mr. Tomkins was a merchant.
     
The 1880 census record listed the Sanders and Tomkins families living together at 209 Maple Street in Centralia. The Sanders' daughter, Jessie was listed as “Jennis”, and two more daughters, Lucy Josephine and Mabel Augusta, had been added to the family. James, who had been in business with his father-in-law, later became a partner in a jewelry store in Centralia.
     
Mr. Tomkins, Mary's father, died in February 1893 , and six months later, Mary's husband James passed away. Mary continued to make her home with her widowed mother. Also living in the home were two of Mary's daughters, Mabel, an artist, and Josephine (Sanders) Beaver and her son, Ralph S. Beaver.
     
Mary, also known as “Mollie”, was the daughter of Francis M. and Lucy A. (Roys) Tomkins. She died on 3 August 1920 and is buried in the Elmwood Cemetery at Centralia, Illinois.
     
James B. Sanders is included in a biographical sketch of his father-in-law, Francis Tomkins. The Sanders portion of the sketch closes with the following comment: “One of his most notable characteristics was his musical ability; not only was he very fond of music, but he displayed great skill in that area and possessed a strong and melodious voice.”
               

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Submitted by Sara Simpson 2019

 

John Wesley POWLEY
29 April 1837 – 7 February 1928


John Powley was born at Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and died in Hammond, Indiana. He was buried in Lexington Cemetery at Lexington, McLean County, Illinois. A small family headstone marks his grave. His parents were William and Susannah (Rhodes) Powley.
   
John's obituary related that his family had moved to Lexington, Illinois in the spring of 1855. John engaged in business manufacturing in May of that year, the first tinware made in Lexington.
   
The 1860 McLean County census record shows the William Powley family as residents of Lexington. John and his younger brother, William David, enlisted in the Army. John served with the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band and William with Co. G 68th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. John returned from service on 1 February 1866 and was married to Margaret Katherine Bricker at her home in Newburg, Pennsylvania. They came to Lexington, Illinois to make their home.
   
The 1870 census reported their family as: John, age 32, a constable, with wife Maggie, age 29 and two children. In 1880, the family had five children: Reese B., Mabel Elizabeth, Anna, John W., Jr., and Margaret Emma. John was working as a tinner.
   
John and Maggie moved from Lexington to Fairbury, Illinois around 1898 and about two years later retired to Chicago. They moved to Hammond, Indiana in 1923 and were living there when John died. Margaret Katherine (Bricker) Powley died on 28 February 1929 at her home in Hammond, Lake County, Indiana. She is buried in Lexington Cemetery at Lexington, Illinois.

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Submitted by Sara Simpson 2019
 

 

Frederick W. MILLIKAN

15 March 1842 – 8 August 1911

 

Fred Millikan was born at the family farmstead just north of Lyndon, Illinois. His parents were Daniel Franklin and Aurelia Sally (Pease) Millikan. Fred is interred in the Lyndon Cemetery just west of the village of Lyndon. “MUSN. FRED'K W. MILLIKAN BAND 33 ILL. INF.” is written on the government issue headstone which marks his grave.

After Fred completed his service with the Army, he returned to the family farm near Lyndon and on 26 March 1862 was married to Emma P. Stone. The farm was the residence for Fred and his family until he died in 1911. 

Fred and Emma were parents of two sons, William F. and Edward Scott. Emma died on 9 August 1885 and was buried in the Lyndon Cemetery. She was the daughter of Thomas J. and Pebe F. (Peabody) Stone.

Fred married Sarah Louisa (Buckley) Bond on 15 November 1887 at Lyndon, Whiteside County, Illinois. They were parents of a son, Daniel Franklin, born in 1891. After Fred's death, Sarah lived with her son Daniel until her death on 12 January 1918. Sarah was buried in Lyndon Cemetery.

The Millikan family, beginning with Fred's father, Daniel, was well known for the production of maple syrup and sugar. In the 1920's and 30's, the Millikan family hosted “sugaring off” parties for the area grade and high school students. When Fred's youngest son, “Frank” passed away in 1938, the parties were discontinued. The trees were cut and processed into fence boards, and the wooded area became a cornfield.

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Edited by Sara Simpson 2021

 

James McWILLIAMS
18 January 1825 – 7 January 1894

The birth place of James McWilliams is consistently cited as Ohio. The community and county of birth as well as the names of his parents have not been found. James is buried in the Riverview Cemetery at Louisiana, Pike County, Missouri. A government issue headstone reads, “JAMES McWILLIAMS BAND 33RD ILL. INF.” This stone is located on a steep hillside among other Civil War markers.


Many of the dates and events that deal with James and his life have come from his Pension files. Some are proven, and others are still in question. James was a very mobile person and also gave conflicting information in his statements to the Board of Pensions.


James and Minerva Blue were married on 4 July 1850 in Ashland County, Ohio. The 1850 census lists James, age 21, Minerva, age 22, and daughter Mary J., age 7 months. The family group included Thomas McWilliams, age 19, possibly the brother of James, and William Conklin, age 16. James, Thomas and William were all shoemakers.


Minerva died in 1860, and James then married Mary E. Carter somewhere in Iowa. James reported that after his service with the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band, he continued working as a shoe and boot maker. He also worked as a laborer for the railroads.


The 1870 census of Indian Grove Twp., Livingston County, Illinois recorded Jas. McWilliams, shoemaker, age 41 and wife Mary E., age 34. The family included daughters Ann and Martha, son Chas., and Thomas McWilliams, age 66, shoemaker. Thomas may be James' father. Mary E. (Carter) McWilliams died in August 1871 near Denver, Colorado.


James married Rebecca Ann (Thurman) Neece on 27 September 1874 at Barry, Pike County, Illinois. After James' death, Rebecca McWilliams married Ulysses S. Seely on 22 October 1899 in Quincy, Adams County, Illinois. The 1900 census of Louisiana, Missouri lists Ulysses Seely, age 70, wife Rebecca A., age 49, and Minnie E. McWilliams, born November 1888, age 11. The death date and burial site for Rebecca are at present unknown.
 

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Submitted by Sara Simpson 2021

 

George Gordon ELDER

10 May 1841- 29 March 1976

George was born in Ohio, possibly in the community of Conneaut, the fifth son of Augustus C. and Lydia (Stewart) Elder. He died in Eureka, Illinois and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Bloomington, Illinois. A government issue marker was placed at the site in November of 1999. “GEORGE GORDON ELDER 2nd MUSICIAN 33 ILL INF CIVIL WAR”.

Vestalina M. Bowen and George Elder were married on 27 January 1864 at the home of F.A. Simons, Bloomington, Illinois. The census of 1870 listed George as a jeweler with wife Lena and daughter Edith living in Neenah, Wisconsin.

Illness brought George and family back to Illinois and nearer to his brothers, Dr. W.A. Elder and Dr. C.S. Elder. George continued working as a jeweler and watch maker until his death in 1876. His was the first death of a veteran of the 33rd Illinois Volunteer Regiment Band.

His wife, Lena, and only child, Edith, went to live at the Illinois Soldiers and Orphans Home in Normal, Illinois. Lena was a staff member, and Edith attended school. Sometime after 1880, Lena took employment at a school for young girls in Jacksonville, Illinois, where daughter Edith continued her education.

 

Mother and daughter left Jacksonville in 1897 and returned to Wisconsin. Edith was married in 1899, and her mother continued to make her home with her daughter and son-in-law, James M. Fifield, in Manitowoc, Wisconsin.

 

This family group moved from Wisconsin, and after a short stay in Michigan, settled in California. In the spring of 1914, Vestalina M. (Bowen) Elder returned to Illinois. She died on 31 August 1927 in Chenoa, Illinois at the home of her niece, Charlotte (Elder) Stilliman. Vestalina is interred near her husband, Geroge, at Evergreen Cemetery, Bloomington, Illinois. Their daughter, Edith, died in California on 11 December 1914. Her ashes are buried near the graves of her parents.

 

Mr. Elder was said to have been a “kind and geneal friend and husband, and his memory will be held in high esteem by friends and relatives”. He is said to have died from “heart disease”.      

 

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Edited by Sara Simpson 2021

 

George M. DUNKLE

19 August 1836 – 21 October 1917

 

 

George, the son of Cyrus R. and Mahala G. (Smith) Dunkle, was born in Fayette County, Ohio and died in the Veterans' Hospital at Danville, Illinois. He was interred at the National Cemetery in Danville. His grave site is marked by a government issue headstone which reads “GEO.M. DUNKLE CO. K 145 ILL. INF”. Also interred at this site is William Dunkle, a Civil War veteran and brother of George.

 

Rebecca Mahulda Kirkpatrick and George Dunkle were married on 26 December 1869 in Lexington, McLean County, Illinois. They remained in Lexington and were listed as members of the household of George's parents in both the 1870 and 1880 census records. He played “alto” in the first Lexington Band organized before the Civil War. 

 

Family Bible records listed the births of five children – Frank, Issa, Cyrus, Maggie, and Flava. Frank was the only child that lived to adulthood.

 

George had occupations as listed in the census of mechanic, carpenter, saddler, and harness maker.

 

Sometime after the death of their son Cyrus, August 1882 in Colfax, Illinois, the family moved to Chicago. Daughter Maggie Ellen died in Chicago on 23 February 1886. Cyrus and Maggie were buried in Scrogin Cemetery, Lexington, McLean County, Illinois.

 

On 15 October 1906, Rebecca notified the Board of Pensions that George had left their Chicago residence and was living at a Soldiers' Home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He had been there since May. She also stated that for the past several years, she had received no part of his $10.00 per month pension payment. This left her without funds, and she continued to live only by the efforts of her own labor, doing wash and other work in the neighborhood.

 

Rebecca died on 7 December 1912 at the home of her only surviving child, Frank Dunkle. Frank and his wife Emma were residents of Lexington, McLean County, Illinois. Rebecca is buried at the Lexington Cemetery.

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Edited by Sara Simpson 2021

 

William H. CUTLER

2 June 1822 – 18 March 1905

 

William, son of John and Catherine (Priest) Cutler, was born in Essex County, New York. He died at Brokaw Hospital, Normal, Illinois. His burial site is at Evergreen Cemetery, Bloomington, Illinois and is marked by a government issue headstone which reads, “Wm CUTLER MUSICIAN 33rd ILL. INF.” This stone is in an area set aside for veterans of the Civil War. He played “tuba” in the first Lexington, Illinois Band organized before the Civil War. 

William was married to Julia Ann Richards on 18 August 1844 in Indiana. The 1850 census record lists them as residents of Paris, Edgar County, Illinois. The family includes William, a mechanic, age 28, his wife, July, age 20, and two children, Mary A. and John.

William, Julia, and three children were living in Lexington, McLean County, Illinois when the 1860 census was recorded. William enlisted in the Army in 1861. Julia Ann died near Chenoa, Illinois on 20 January 1864.

William was married to Frances Hinman on 11 January 1865 in McLean County, Illinois. This family has, as yet not been found in the 1870 census. William and Fannie appear as residents of Bloomington, Ilinois in both the 1880 and 1900 censuses. After William's death in 1905, Fannie went to live at the Soldiers' Widows' Home in Wilmington, Will County, Illinois. She resided there until her death in January 1911.

William was the father of eight children, five who were born to his wife Julia and three who were born to Frances. Four of the children died at a young age.

William's obituary states that for sixteen years he was the engineer at the Old Eagle, later known as the Hungarian Mills in Bloomington, Illinois. He also worked as engineer at the Wakefield Medicine Factory and later was engineer for the Bloomington Stove Company until a few months before his death.

In a posting of the Cutler Family Tree, it has been suggested that William Cutler's great great grandfather, John Cutler (b. 1600 in Sprowston, Norfolk, England and d. 1638 in Hingham, Massachusetts) arrived in New England in 1637. His third great grandfather is listed as a patriot through the Sons of the American Revolution.

 

 

Research and Article Written by Liz Veselack October 2002, Edited by Sara Simpson 2021